Recently I posted an essay about my experiences at Harvard Divinity School. In particular, I argued that because HDS is so concerned with making its students feel comfortable, intellectual and ethical standards suffer. One consequence is the school’s willingness to endorse students for the ministry, regardless of how unsound – and even harmful – their […]

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During my second year at Harvard Divinity School, I listened to a classmate describe a challenge she’d experienced as a Sunday school teacher. She had planned a lesson on Noah and the Ark; instead of listening, her students galloped around the room, knocking things over and making a mess. My first reaction was “Good!” This […]

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Between the Cliff’s Edge and the Lion’s Mouth

by Matt B. on January 23, 2015

Can Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity help us understand OCD? In this episode, I yap about tension and resistance, matter and gravity, Newton and Euclid, Adam and Eve, right and wrong, and Chinese finger traps.

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OCD manifests in a million weird ways – including the tendency to apologize, ad nauseum, for things that never happened. And at a deeper level, that’s what OCD is: an endless apology to myself for being who I am.

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Three Rules of Thumb for Responding to OCD

by Matt B. on January 16, 2015

In this episode, I discuss three heuristics that help me navigate OCD – when I can remember them, that is.

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OCD and Parenting: A Conversation with Sean Hardy

January 10, 2015

Sean Hardy has obsessive-compulsive disorder. He also has a wife, a young daughter, and a second child on the way. In this episode, Sean and I discuss how becoming a father has changed the way he thinks about – and responds to – his OCD.

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OCD and Reading

December 12, 2014

My dad once told me that I’m the best-read person he knows. I was flattered, but something about the description rang false. He meant: you’ve read a heck of a lot of books. I thought: yes, but I haven’t necessarily read them well.

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